Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Arthritis

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If you have arthritis you must take travel insurance when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment. The cost of receiving medical treatment away from the UK can be very high. For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people with arthritis).

Travellers with arthritis have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with arthritis, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

For example, a 54 year old male, travelling to the United States of America for 1 week would pay around £13.42 if they didn’t have arthritis, but for the same person with arthritis, the premium could be £36.41, that’s around 3 times more expensive.

Sometimes customers with arthritis might also suffer with another condition. In our example the premium would still be £36.41 assuming the applicant was taking 2 additional medications for high blood pressure.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are high blood pressure, high cholesterol and whether you smoke.

Arthritis and travel insurance

Arthritis is a form of joint disorder that involves inflammation of one or more joints. There are over 100 different forms of arthritis. The most common form, osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease), is a result of trauma to the joint, infection of the joint, or age. Other arthritis forms are rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and related autoimmune diseases. Septic arthritis is caused by joint infection.

The major complaint by individuals who have arthritis is joint pain. Pain is often a constant and may be localised to the joint affected. The pain from arthritis is due to inflammation that occurs around the joint, damage to the joint from disease, daily wear and tear of joint, muscle strains caused by forceful movements against stiff painful joints and fatigue.

Classification

Generally when a person has "arthritis" it means that they have one of these diseases, which include:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Gout and pseudo-gout
  • Septic arthritis
  • Ankylosing spondylitis
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis
  • Still's disease
Joint pain can also be a symptom of other diseases. In this case, the arthritis is considered to be secondary to the main disease; these include:

  • Psoriasis (Psoriatic arthritis)
  • Reactive arthritis
  • Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
  • Haemochromatosis
  • Hepatitis
  • Lyme disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis)
  • Henoch-Schönlein purpura
  • Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with recurrent fever
  • Sarcoidosis
  • TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome
  • Wegener's granulomatosis (and many other vasculitis syndromes)
  • Familial Mediterranean fever
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
An undifferentiated arthritis is an arthritis that does not fit into well-known clinical disease categories, possibly being an early stage of a definite rheumatic disease.

Signs and symptoms

Regardless of the type of arthritis, the common symptoms for all arthritis disorders include varied levels of pain, swelling, joint stiffness, and sometimes a constant ache around the joint(s). Arthritic disorders like lupus and rheumatoid can also affect other organs in the body with a variety of symptoms.

  • Inability to use the hand or walk
  • Malaise and a feeling of tiredness
  • Weight loss
  • Poor sleep
  • Muscle aches and pains
  • Tenderness
  • Difficulty moving the joint
It is common in advanced arthritis for significant secondary changes to occur. For example, in someone who has limited their physical activity:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Loss of flexibility
  • Decreased aerobic fitness
These changes can also impact on life and social roles, such as community involvement.

All of these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with arthritis.

And finally, those that are awaiting a diagnosis or additional tests face the heftiest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.